{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 77, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/77", "Disp_Access_No" : "01-P-471", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1876", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1876", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1876", "Disp_Title" : "A Short Break (at the Barber's)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Emile Salome", "Sort_Artist" : "Salome, Emile", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 32 3/8 in. (61 x 82.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "32 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by Joseph Klock Esq. and the late Joseph Simon", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "France", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/01-P-471.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/01-P-471.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/01-P-471.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/01-P-471.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "10", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 323, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/323", "Disp_Access_No" : "07-P-529", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1884", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1884", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1884", "Disp_Title" : "The Letter", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Maria Brooks", "Sort_Artist" : "Brooks, Maria", "Disp_Dimen" : "29 1/2 x 24 1/2 in. (74.9 x 62.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "29 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>Brooks is known primarily for her oil portraits and flower paintings. She studied at the South Kensington and Royal Academy Schools in London before opening a studio in Montreal, then moving to New York. The artist had a knack for evoking emotions from her subjects. <SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">The Quarterly Illustrator</SPAN> (1893) quoted her as telling one sitter, “You have a hundred faces… Now we will talk awhile until you get around to the one I want.” <BR/><BR/>Exhibition reviews in the Montreal Gazette (April 1885) titled this painting “<SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">Far, Far Away</SPAN>” because, “It is that of a young girl, who, having just read a letter from her sailor lover, is thinking tenderly of him, and it can be seen at a glance that she is regretting that he is so far, far awa<SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">y</SPAN>.” Also, Goupil &amp; Co., who printed photogravures of this work, titled it <SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">“I Wonder if He Really Means It.” <BR/></SPAN><BR/>Emily Levy, '12<BR/>Curatorial Intern</SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by the Art Angels", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/07-P-529.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/07-P-529.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/07-P-529.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/07-P-529.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "53", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 777, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/777", "Disp_Access_No" : "11-P-546", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1871", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1871", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1871", "Disp_Title" : "Whistler by the Thames, 1871", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Greaves,Walter", "Sort_Artist" : "Greaves,Walter", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 3/8 x 19 3/8 in. (59.4 x 49.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "19 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening", "Medium" : "oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>One can imagine James McNeill Whistler posing for this portrait, seated on the balcony of his London flat overlooking the Thames River. But the circumstances surrounding the painting’s origins are shrouded in mystery. During the 1860s and 1870s, Walter and his brother Henry Greaves were ardent students of Whistler, assisting with major commissions such as the Peacock Room. However, their relationship became estranged in the 1880s, and Walter Greaves fell into poverty, though he continued painting portraits of Whistler from memory. Following the discovery of rolls of canvases at a London pawn shop, the Goupil Gallery offered Greaves an exhibition in 1911, requiring him to sign and date many of the paintings retroactively. While the exhibition was a success, the detection that a key painting had been misdated ultimately led to a scandal, raising questions about the chronology as well as authorship of some of the paintings. <BR/><BR/>This was one of 14 paintings by Greaves that were purchased by the Rosenbach Museum co-founder Philip H. Rosenbach in 1911, which he was unable to resell due to the scandal. In 2010, with the approval of its Board of Trustees, Rosenbach Museum and Library deaccessioned all of its paintings by Greaves, auctioning off all except one that they considered the finest, which they gifted to La Salle University. It is a fascinating example of British Aestheticism, highly evocative of Whistler’s work, with an interesting and enigmatic history.<BR/><BR/><SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">This painting was conserved with support from the Irwin Nat and Marjorie M. Pincus Endowment and the Art Angels in 2011. For details, visit our online conservation exhibit: http://artmuseum.lasalle.edu", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Rosenbach Museum and Library", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/11-P-546.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/11-P-546.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/11-P-546.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/11-P-546.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "67", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 992, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/992", "Disp_Access_No" : "13-P-558", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "19th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Father's Return", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Harriet Cany Peale", "Sort_Artist" : "Peale, Harriet Cany", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 19 3/4 in. (61 x 50.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "19 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Canvas", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>Harriet Cany Peale was the second wife of Rembrandt Peale. In 1840 he and Harriet married, and she also became his student and assistant. In that same year she began exhibiting her work in Philadelphia at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Artists’ Fund Society, and continued to exhibit regularly throughout the rest of her life. She has been associated with the Hudson River School of painting, and is primarily known for landscapes, portraits, and still-life, as well as copies of her husband’s and other artist’s works. She frequently collaborated with Rembrandt Peale on copies of his famous “Porthole” painting of George Washington (Patriae Pater).<BR/><BR/><SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">Father’s Retur</SPAN>n depicts a pleasant and sentimental genre scene of 19th-century domestic life.<BR/></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/13-P-558.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/13-P-558.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/13-P-558.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/13-P-558.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "79", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1369, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1369", "Disp_Access_No" : "71-P-84", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "19th Century (c.1880)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Portrait of an Artist in Her Studio", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Emile-August Carolus-Duran", "Sort_Artist" : "Carolus-Duran, Charles Emile-August", "Disp_Dimen" : "45 1/2 x 34 1/8 in. (115.6 x 86.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "45 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "34 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>Carolus-Duran was a friend of avant-garde painters, but his more academic style reflects his decision to pursue lucrative commissions as a society portraitist. His work combines elements of contemporary Impressionism with more conventional painting techniques. The artist’s use of quick, loose brushwork owes at least as much, however, to Spanish old masters such as Diego Velásquez, whose work Carolus-Duran greatly admired, as to contemporaries such as Edouard Manet. The model for <SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">Artist in her Studi</SPAN>o is believed to be the artist’s wife, Pauline Croizette, who declared her profession as an artist on their marriage certificate and continued to exhibit works in the Salon after their marriage.<BR/><BR/><BR/><BR/></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "France", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71-P-84.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71-P-84.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71-P-84.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71-P-84.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "102", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1571, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1571", "Disp_Access_No" : "74-P-148", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1867", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1867", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1867", "Disp_Title" : "Arab Children at Play", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Eugene Fromentin", "Sort_Artist" : "Fromentin, Eugene", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 5/8 x 12 3/4 in. (24.4 x 32.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "panel", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on panel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Noah Butkin", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "France", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74-P-148.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74-P-148.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74-P-148.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74-P-148.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "134", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2017, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2017", "Disp_Access_No" : "78-P-209", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1851", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1851", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1851", "Disp_Title" : "Lager Beer Saloon", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Christian Schussele", "Sort_Artist" : "Schussele, Christian", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 3/4 x 24 3/4 in. (52.7 x 62.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Gallery Label: Although Schuessele’s style is academic, this ribald tavern scene with its predominantly brown palette is modeled on 17th-century Dutch genre scenes of common folk and everyday merry-making. Gas lights, with clearly visible delivery pipes, illuminate the room. The Franklin Institute awarded this painting the First Premium prize. Schuessele was born in the Alsace region and studied lithography in Paris before settling in Philadelphia around 1848. He became Professor of Painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 1868. Schuessele established the Ladies Life Class in 1869, the first course to allow female students to study from the live model. ", "Dedication" : "", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78-P-209.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78-P-209.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78-P-209.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78-P-209.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "162", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2487, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2487", "Disp_Access_No" : "82-P-278", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1819", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1819", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1819", "Disp_Title" : "Le Relai de la Diligence D'eau a Trévoux sur La Saône", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jean-Antoine Duclaux", "Sort_Artist" : "Duclaux, Jean-Antoine", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 7/8 x 31 1/2 in. (53 x 80 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "31 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "France", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/82-P-278.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/82-P-278.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/82-P-278.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/82-P-278.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "188", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2488, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2488", "Disp_Access_No" : "82-P-282", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "c. 1890", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1885", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1895", "Disp_Title" : "Landscape", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, French", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, French", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 1/2 x 20 3/8 in. (21.6 x 51.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "Masonite panel (poss. cardboard lined w/masonite board)", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on Masonite panel (poss. cardboard lined w/masonite board)", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Gallery Label: The Nabis were a group of Symbolist artists who took their name from the Hebrew word for “prophet.” Their use of color was greatly influenced by the anti-natural, opaque colors of Paul Gauguin. Instead of replicating the look of colors in nature, they used color more expressively and symbolically following Gauguin’s instruction to Paul Sérusier that if one saw green in a tree, the entire tree should be painted green. The simplified, flat planes of color, rounded forms, and the artist’s choice of cardboard as a support to obtain even greater flatness and opacity in the paint’s appearance are all hallmarks of Nabis work in the early 1890s. ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Benjamin D. Bernstein", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "France", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/82-P-282.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/82-P-282.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/82-P-282.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/82-P-282.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "298", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2687, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2687", "Disp_Access_No" : "84-P-298", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1898", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1898", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1898", "Disp_Title" : "Mary (La Sainte-Marie)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Henry Ossawa Tanner", "Sort_Artist" : "Tanner, Henry Ossawa", "Disp_Dimen" : "34 1/8 x 42 5/8 in. (86.7 x 108.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "34 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "42 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>In this unconventional rendering of the Virgin Mary with the Christ child, Mary appears melancholy and lost in thought. The infant is almost completely covered by a shroud-like cloth, suggesting a foreshadowing of Jesus’ death. Tanner paid careful attention to details studied first-hand in Jerusalem, where he first traveled in 1898. Tanner’s style is academic and is distinctive for his use of luminous lighting. The model for Mary was newlywed Tanner’s Swedish-American wife. Tanner studied with Thomas Eakins at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in the 1880s before traveling to and eventually settling in Paris, where, from 1894 on, his work appeared in the annual, juried Salon. <SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">Mary</SPAN> is in its original tabernacle frame with its Salon entry number, 1252, and another label noting Tanner’s previous Salon medal for an earlier painting. While it was common for American artists to travel to Paris to study art and even settle in that art-making capital, Tanner attributed his choice to remain there to the racism he encountered in the United States as an artist of mixed African-, European-, and Native-American ancestry and his ability to be judged simply by his talent in France.<BR/></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by Regina and Ragan Henry", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84-P-298.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84-P-298.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84-P-298.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84-P-298.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "196", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2695, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2695", "Disp_Access_No" : "84-SC-34", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "19th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Allegorical Statue, striding lady with lillies", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Pittaluga", "Sort_Artist" : "Pittaluga", "Disp_Dimen" : "38 1/2 x 13 1/4 x 10 1/8 in. (97.8 x 33.7 x 25.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "38 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "13 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "white marble", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "white marble", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by Mrs. Lessing J. Rosenwald", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "SCULPTURE", "Creation_Place2" : "Italy", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84-SC-34_front.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84-SC-34_front.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84-SC-34_front.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84-SC-34_front.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "6136", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84-SC-34_right.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84-SC-34_right.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84-SC-34_right.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84-SC-34_right.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "6138", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3007, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3007", "Disp_Access_No" : "90-P-367", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "19th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Rue de la Sante and Le Val de Grace", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Luigi Loir", "Sort_Artist" : "Loir, Luigi", "Disp_Dimen" : "16 5/8 x 8 1/2 in. (42.2 x 21.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "16 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "8 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by Alexis C. Manice", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "France", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/90-P-367.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/90-P-367.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/90-P-367.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/90-P-367.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "236", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3012, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3012", "Disp_Access_No" : "90-P-374", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "Early 19th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1832", "Disp_Title" : "Ann Emily Rush", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "James Peale", "Sort_Artist" : "Peale, James", "Disp_Dimen" : "29 x 24 5/8 in. 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Manice", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/90-P-374.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/90-P-374.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/90-P-374.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/90-P-374.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "241", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3051, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3051", "Disp_Access_No" : "91-P-389", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1838", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1838", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1838", "Disp_Title" : "Self-Portrait", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Rembrandt Peale", "Sort_Artist" : "Peale, Rembrandt", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 1/2 x 14 1/2 in. (44.5 x 36.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "14 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening-oval", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Gallery Label: Rembrandt was the second son of Charles Willson Peale. He was born in Bucks County and spent much of his career in Philadelphia. He is best known for the portrait of George Washington he painted as a teenager working alongside his father who was completing a commissioned portrait of the first President. In 1814, Rembrandt opened the first museum in North America designed specifically to exhibit art, known as "Peale's Baltimore Museum and Gallery of Fine Arts.” He painted this relatively informal, intimate self-portrait for his niece and art pupil, Mary, daughter of his brother and fellow-painter Rubens Peale. ", "Dedication" : "", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/91-P-389.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/91-P-389.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/91-P-389.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/91-P-389.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "254", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3052, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3052", "Disp_Access_No" : "91-P-390", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "19th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Le Palais des Doges, Venice, circa 1906", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Henri Le Sidaner", "Sort_Artist" : "Le Sidaner, Henri", "Disp_Dimen" : "5 3/4 x 7 3/8 in. 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Thune", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "France", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/91-P-390.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/91-P-390.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/91-P-390.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/91-P-390.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "255", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3257, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3257", "Disp_Access_No" : "94-SC-45", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "19th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Persephone", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "G. Fedele", "Sort_Artist" : "Fedele, G.", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 3/4 x 11 1/8 x 6 1/4 in. 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(7.6 x 5.1 x 1.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Daguerreotype", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Daguerreotype", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>With the invention of the Daguerreotype in France in 1839, an accurate likeness could be obtained for just a few dollars. The low price made it difficult for artists to compete, and many miniature painters switched to the new medium of photography, sometimes adding color tinting to black and white images. Daguerreotype portraits quickly became very popular, and photography studios proliferated in many cities. Philadelphia led the way. By 1856 there were more than one hundred photographers operating in the city, with studios clustered east of Broad Street along Chestnut and Market, and north on 2nd Street. Photographers continued to experiment with processes and chemicals to improve the quality of the images, gradually making way for the kinds of photographs with which we are familiar today.<BR/><BR/>Like small painted portraits on ivory, early photographic portraits were displayed and protected in hard decorative cases lined in velvet. The portraits were unique originals with no negatives. In the 1890s George Eastman’s introduction of flexible rolled negative film and the Kodak camera led to more widespread general interest in photography.<BR/><BR/><SPAN STYLE="font-weight:bold">Daguerreotypes</SPAN> were popular from 1839 through the 1860s but continued in use well beyond this time. The image was set on a polished silver-coated metal plate, without any chemical emulsion; the plate was encased in glass to prevent the silver from tarnishing. The polished silver surface created a mirrored reflection and a somewhat ghostly effect. <SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Calibri';font-size:12pt"><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds from the Art Angels", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PHOTOGRAPHY", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/14-Ph-168_detail.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/14-Ph-168_detail.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/14-Ph-168_detail.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/14-Ph-168_detail.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1666", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/14-Ph-168.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/14-Ph-168.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/14-Ph-168.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/14-Ph-168.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1667", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/14-Ph-168_case.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/14-Ph-168_case.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/14-Ph-168_case.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/14-Ph-168_case.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1668", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4052, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4052", "Disp_Access_No" : "14-Ph-172", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "c. 1850-1899", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1850", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Hand-colored Portrait of a Bearded Man", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 x 2 1/2 x 3/4 in. (7.6 x 6.4 x 1.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Tintype, Hand-colored", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Tintype, Hand-colored", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>With the invention of the Daguerreotype in France in 1839, an accurate likeness could be obtained for just a few dollars. The low price made it difficult for artists to compete, and many miniature painters switched to the new medium of photography, sometimes adding color tinting to black and white images. Daguerreotype portraits quickly became very popular, and photography studios proliferated in many cities. Philadelphia led the way. By 1856 there were more than one hundred photographers operating in the city, with studios clustered east of Broad Street along Chestnut and Market, and north on 2nd Street. Photographers continued to experiment with processes and chemicals to improve the quality of the images, gradually making way for the kinds of photographs with which we are familiar today.<BR/><BR/>Like small painted portraits on ivory, early photographic portraits were displayed and protected in hard decorative cases lined in velvet. The portraits were unique originals with no negatives. In the 1890s George Eastman’s introduction of flexible rolled negative film and the Kodak camera led to more widespread general interest in photography.<SPAN STYLE="font-weight:bold"><BR/><BR/>Tintypes </SPAN>were popular from the 1850s through the 1890s. The image was set on a tin or iron plate, covered with a silver halide emulsion. Tintypes were preferred by American Civil War soldiers because they were lightweight and could easily be carried into battle.<BR/></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds from the Art Angels", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PHOTOGRAPHY", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/14-Ph-172_detail.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/14-Ph-172_detail.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/14-Ph-172_detail.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/14-Ph-172_detail.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1657", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/14-Ph-172_case.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/14-Ph-172_case.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/14-Ph-172_case.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/14-Ph-172_case.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1658", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/14-Ph-172.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/14-Ph-172.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/14-Ph-172.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/14-Ph-172.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1659", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4053, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4053", "Disp_Access_No" : "15-Ph-173", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "c. 1850-1899", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1850", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Seated Woman with Gloves", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown Artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown Artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 3/4 x 3 1/4 x 1 in. (9.5 x 8.3 x 2.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Daguerreotype, Hand-colored", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Daguerreotype, Hand-colored", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>With the invention of the Daguerreotype in France in 1839, an accurate likeness could be obtained for just a few dollars. The low price made it difficult for artists to compete, and many miniature painters switched to the new medium of photography, sometimes adding color tinting to black and white images. Daguerreotype portraits quickly became very popular, and photography studios proliferated in many cities. Philadelphia led the way. By 1856 there were more than one hundred photographers operating in the city, with studios clustered east of Broad Street along Chestnut and Market, and north on 2nd Street. Photographers continued to experiment with processes and chemicals to improve the quality of the images, gradually making way for the kinds of photographs with which we are familiar today.<BR/><BR/>Like small painted portraits on ivory, early photographic portraits were displayed and protected in hard decorative cases lined in velvet. The portraits were unique originals with no negatives. In the 1890s George Eastman’s introduction of flexible rolled negative film and the Kodak camera led to more widespread general interest in photography.<BR/><BR/><SPAN STYLE="font-weight:bold">Daguerreotypes</SPAN> were popular from 1839 through the 1860s but continued in use well beyond this time. The image was set on a polished silver-coated metal plate, without any chemical emulsion; the plate was encased in glass to prevent the silver from tarnishing. The polished silver surface created a mirrored reflection and a somewhat ghostly effect. </SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by Kerry L. Bryan in memory of Mrs. Elizabeth E. Hutter (1821-1895) ", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PHOTOGRAPHY", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/15-Ph-173.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/15-Ph-173.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/15-Ph-173.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/15-Ph-173.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1741", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/15-Ph-173_case.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/15-Ph-173_case.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/15-Ph-173_case.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/15-Ph-173_case.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1742", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/15-Ph-173_open.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/15-Ph-173_open.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/15-Ph-173_open.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/15-Ph-173_open.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1743", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4054, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4054", "Disp_Access_No" : "15-Ph-174", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "c. 1850-1899", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1850", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Seated Woman with Gilded Necklace", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 1/4 x 5 1/8 x 1 in. (15.9 x 13 x 2.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Ambrotype, Hand-colored", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Ambrotype, Hand-colored", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>With the invention of the Daguerreotype in France in 1839, an accurate likeness could be obtained for just a few dollars. The low price made it difficult for artists to compete, and many miniature painters switched to the new medium of photography, sometimes adding color tinting to black and white images. Daguerreotype portraits quickly became very popular, and photography studios proliferated in many cities. Philadelphia led the way. By 1856 there were more than one hundred photographers operating in the city, with studios clustered east of Broad Street along Chestnut and Market, and north on 2nd Street. Photographers continued to experiment with processes and chemicals to improve the quality of the images, gradually making way for the kinds of photographs with which we are familiar today.<BR/><BR/>Like small painted portraits on ivory, early photographic portraits were displayed and protected in hard decorative cases lined in velvet. The portraits were unique originals with no negatives. In the 1890s George Eastman’s introduction of flexible rolled negative film and the Kodak camera led to more widespread general interest in photography.<BR/><BR/><SPAN STYLE="font-weight:bold">Ambrotypes</SPAN> were popular from the 1850s through the 1860s but continued in use through the 1890s. The image was set on glass plate, with a chemical emulsion applied to the surface. The glass was backed with a black surface, and the images appeared clearly without any reflection. <BR/></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds from the Art Angels", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PHOTOGRAPHY", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/15-Ph-174.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/15-Ph-174.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/15-Ph-174.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/15-Ph-174.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1744", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/15-Ph-174_case.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/15-Ph-174_case.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/15-Ph-174_case.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/15-Ph-174_case.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1745", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/15-Ph-174_open.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/15-Ph-174_open.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/15-Ph-174_open.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/15-Ph-174_open.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1746", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4058, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4058", "Disp_Access_No" : "15-Ph-178", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "c. 1850-1899", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1850", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Portrait of Young Union Soldier", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown", "Disp_Dimen" : "2 7/8 x 2 3/8 x 3/4 in. (7.3 x 6 x 1.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "2 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Case Closed", "Medium" : "Ambrotype, Hand-colored", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Ambrotype, Hand-colored", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>With the invention of the Daguerreotype in France in 1839, an accurate likeness could be obtained for just a few dollars. The low price made it difficult for artists to compete, and many miniature painters switched to the new medium of photography, sometimes adding color tinting to black and white images. Daguerreotype portraits quickly became very popular, and photography studios proliferated in many cities. Philadelphia led the way. By 1856 there were more than one hundred photographers operating in the city, with studios clustered east of Broad Street along Chestnut and Market, and north on 2nd Street. Photographers continued to experiment with processes and chemicals to improve the quality of the images, gradually making way for the kinds of photographs with which we are familiar today.<BR/><BR/>Like small painted portraits on ivory, early photographic portraits were displayed and protected in hard decorative cases lined in velvet. The portraits were unique originals with no negatives. In the 1890s George Eastman’s introduction of flexible rolled negative film and the Kodak camera led to more widespread general interest in photography.<BR/><BR/><SPAN STYLE="font-weight:bold">Ambrotypes</SPAN> were popular from the 1850s through the 1860s but continued in use through the 1890s. The image was set on glass plate, with a chemical emulsion applied to the surface. The glass was backed with a black surface, and the images appeared clearly without any reflection. <BR/></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by William V. Toner, class of '65", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PHOTOGRAPHY", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/15-Ph-178.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/15-Ph-178.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/15-Ph-178.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/15-Ph-178.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1756", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/15-Ph-178_case.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/15-Ph-178_case.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/15-Ph-178_case.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/15-Ph-178_case.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1757", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/15-Ph-178_open.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/15-Ph-178_open.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/15-Ph-178_open.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/15-Ph-178_open.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1758", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 630, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/630", "Disp_Access_No" : "11-MM-14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1820s", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1820", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1820", "Disp_Title" : "Peale's Museum Hollow-Cut Silhouette Portrait of Louisa", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Edward Williams Clay", "Sort_Artist" : "Clay, Edward Williams", "Disp_Dimen" : "5 x 3 3/4 in. (12.7 x 9.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "5 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "White paper", "Support" : "black background", "Disp_Medium" : "White paper on black background", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>Silhouette portraits on paper were a very inexpensive means of creating a profile likeness of an individual. With this kind of portrait, the artist would cut a profile of the sitter in paper, then mount it on a dark paper or fabric for contrast. <BR/><BR/>In response to the popular demand for silhouette portraits during the 18th century, a device called the physiognotrace was invented to mechanize the process for quickly producing multiple profiles at once. Using this device, a person would sit facing sideways while an artist-operator guided a dowel along their profile, causing a pointed instrument to impress an outline onto a twice-folded sheet of white paper to create four exact profiles at once. The artist would often enhance the final portraits with freehand cutting of the hair and eyelashes.<BR/><BR/>In 1803, when the physiognotrace was introduced at Charles Willson Peale’s Museum in Philadelphia, about 8,800 people (80% of visitors) purchased a set of profile portraits, at a cost of 8 cents each. That same year, Raphaelle Peale also travelled to the American South with a physiognotrace, making silhouette portraits more widely available to the general public. <BR/><BR/>This silhouette portrait bears an embossment from Charles Willson Peale’s Museum.<SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Calibri';font-size:13pt"><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gift of Paul F. Betz, '61", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "MIXED MEDIA", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/11-MM-14_front.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/11-MM-14_front.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/11-MM-14_front.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/11-MM-14_front.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "6066", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5093, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5093", "Disp_Access_No" : "15-P-585", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "19th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Portrait of Helena Lawrence Holmes Penington (1769-1852)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Sarah Miriam Peale", "Sort_Artist" : "Peale, Sarah Miriam", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 17 1/2 in. (61 x 44.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "17 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>Born in Philadelphia, Sarah Miriam Peale along with her sisters, Margaretta Angelica and Anna Claypoole Peale trained as artists under the tutelage of their father, James Peale, serving as his apprentices. Sarah was known for her portraiture and still-life paintings. She moved to Baltimore for instruction in oil painting and glazing techniques and remained there for 20 years before moving to St. Louis where she was commissioned by various families. She is regarded by many as the first woman in the United States to achieve professional recognition as an artist. In 1824, Sarah and Anna became the first two female members of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. <BR/><BR/>This portrait was probably painted by Sarah at a young age, and was possibly painted together with Anna and instruction from their father.<SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Book Antiqua';font-size:16pt"><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by the Art Angels", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/15-P-585.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/15-P-585.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/15-P-585.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/15-P-585.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "5217", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5449, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5449", "Disp_Access_No" : "16-P-589", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "Late 19th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1867", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Belfield Farm, Germantown, PA", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Anna Peale Sellers", "Sort_Artist" : "Sellers, Anna Peale", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 3/4 x 28 1/4 in. (52.7 x 71.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "28 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "board", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN>Gallery Label:<BR/><BR/>Anna Peale Sellers was the granddaughter of Charles Willson Peale through his daughter Sophonisba. She studied in Rome during the 1860s and at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in the late 1870s and early 1880s.<BR/><BR/>As noted on the reverse of the work, this scene is copied from a work by Sellers' grandfather, Charles Willson Peale. In an 1818 letter to his son Rembrandt about the view depicted here, Charles wrote: "I have chosen two views which I wish to paint. One is at the beginning of the rise of the high hill leading to Germantown. It takes in my obelisk, Barn and mansion House and both the Summer Houses--The Gate &amp; willow tree on the left, the hill back of the Garden; the road, the water in the road &amp; mill race, and a piece of Mr. Wister's wood for a finish on the right of the picture."<BR/><BR/><SPAN STYLE="color:#221E1F">Peale resided at Belfield, his “retirement” home, from 1810 to 1821, and his house still stands on La Salle University campus. In 1826, Belfield was sold to neighbor William Logan Fisher. That same year, Fisher gifted the house to his daughter, Sarah Logan Fisher upon her marriage to William Wister. 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The house once stood at the northeast corner of Ogontz and Lindley Avenues, but was unfortunately destroyed by fire in 1985. In 1807 William Logan Fisher inherited Wakefield estate from his father and lived there with his family. In 1826, Fisher purchased Belfield from neighbor Charles Willson Peale, and gifted the house to his daughter, Sarah Logan Fisher (1806-1891) upon her marriage to William Wister (1801-1881) that same year. Fisher’s son Thomas Rodman Fisher (1802-1861) built “Little Wakefield” in 1829, which still stands today on La Salle University campus as St. Mutien Hall. ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Michael T. 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