{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 4220, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4220", "Disp_Access_No" : "15-G-3688", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1996", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1996", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1996", "Disp_Title" : "Mental Health Survey", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Paul Valadez", "Sort_Artist" : "Valadez, Paul", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 5/8 x 8 5/8 in. (29.5 x 21.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "8 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Chine Collé", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Chine Collé", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Artist", "Copyright_Type" : "Artwork © the artist or artist's estate", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/15-G-3688.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/15-G-3688.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/15-G-3688.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/15-G-3688.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2287", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 997, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/997", "Disp_Access_No" : "13-T-154", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2009", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2009", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2009", "Disp_Title" : "Immigration Reform Girl", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Shepard Fairey", "Sort_Artist" : "Fairey, Shepard", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 5/8 x 22 5/8 in. (77.8 x 57.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "22 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Offset Color Lithograph", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Offset Color Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><BR/><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">Label from </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt;font-style:italic">Border Crossings: Immigration in Contemporary Prints</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">, La Salle University Art Museum, March 16 - June 9, 2016:</SPAN><BR/><BR/>I am an immigrant. My ancestors left England and Scotland to come to this land to create a better life for themselves and their families. America is a land of immigrants. Ironically, the peoples who this land was inhabited by before “Americans” were Native Americans of North and South American descent. I bring up this history not to stir up controversy or animosity, but to simply point out the complexity of who is entitled to live here. Something that is not complex and should not be controversial is the right of all humans to be treated like humans. People coming to America for the same reasons our ancestors did deserve human rights. The United States was created by immigrants and now our country needs immigration reform. I collaborated on this project with my co-worker Ernesto Yerena who shot the photos and helped with the graphics. Zack De La Rocha and Producciones Cimarron provided input and support. All the proceeds from these posters go to creating materials for the May Day marches and donations for immigration reform organizations. Thanks for supporting human rights!<BR/><BR/>– Shepard Fairey<BR/> ObeyGiant.com<BR/><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt"><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by the Art Angels", "Copyright_Type" : "Artwork © Ernesto Yerena Mantejano and Shepard Fairey", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/13-T-154.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/13-T-154.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/13-T-154.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/13-T-154.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "3515", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1050, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1050", "Disp_Access_No" : "14-G-3654", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2010", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2010", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2010", "Disp_Title" : "La Marcha de Los Desvalidos (The March of the Powerless)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Tony Ortega", "Sort_Artist" : "Ortega, Tony", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 x 16 in. (50.8 x 40.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Screen Print", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Screen Print", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><BR/><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">Label from </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt;font-style:italic">Border Crossings: Immigration in Contemporary Prints</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">, La Salle University Art Museum, March 16 - June 9, 2016:</SPAN><BR/><BR/>As an expressionistic printmaker, I use distortion and exaggeration for emotional effect. I apply vivid and dynamic color, overlapping transparent color with opaque color. I combine flat space with cubical space. I merge abstraction, simplification, and realism. I juxtapose and superimpose unlikely images of realism, icons, symbols and fantasy from history and the contemporary world to foster opportunities for the bending of meaning and the warping of time and place. <BR/><BR/>In this silkscreen I combine my reinterpretation of Mount Rushmore with the May 1, 2006 national rally, "A Day without Immigrants." I use Mount Rushmore which is one of the most recognizable icons of the U.S. I replace the heads of the four U.S. presidents with the Latino portraits of Che Ernesto <SPAN STYLE="color:#222222">Guevara</SPAN>, Frida Kahlo, César Chavez and Rodolfo Corky Gonzales. May 1, 2006 was an important day in U.S. history: 10 million immigrants, activists and allies in over 200 cities from across the country chose to skip work, school, and the normal daily routine to participate in "A Day without Immigrants." A national boycott, general strikes, rallies and symbolic actions were held in order to demand basic rights for all immigrants, and to build a new multi-ethnic united civil rights movement. <BR/><BR/>As a contemporary Chicano printmaker, I note the changing demographics of this country as the Latino population increases. Our southern border is no longer just El Paso, Ju<SPAN STYLE="color:#252525">á</SPAN>rez, San Diego or Tijuana. The border also exists here in Denver, in Los Angeles and in Phoenix. It either expands or is shot full of holes. Cultures and languages mutually influence each other. The U.S. is indeed the final destination of many human migrations, the result of multiple factors like unemployment, overpopulation and especially the enormous economic disparity between North and South. My artwork reflects the integration of culture, history, religion and the changing demographics of Latinos in the U.S.<BR/><BR/>—Tony Ortega<SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt"><BR/><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by the Art Angels", "Copyright_Type" : "Artwork © Tony Ortega", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/14-G-3654.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/14-G-3654.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/14-G-3654.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/14-G-3654.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "3413", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5154, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5154", "Disp_Access_No" : "16-G-3751", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2016", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2016", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2016", "Disp_Title" : "Eres mi Todo (You are My Everything)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Michelle Angela Ortiz", "Sort_Artist" : "Ortiz, Michelle Angela", "Disp_Dimen" : "16 x 16 in. (40.6 x 40.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Digital Print", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Digital Print", "Info_Page_Comm" : " See the interpretive label written by Candace Robertson-James, DrPH, MPH, <i>Director and Assistant Professor, Master of Public Health Program</i>, for the exhibition <i>Teaching and Learning in the Art Museum: La Salle University Faculty Selections</i> in the online exhibition <a href="https://digitalcommons.lasalle.edu/faculty_selections_2018/22/">HERE</a>. <SPAN><BR/><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">Label from </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt;font-style:italic">Border Crossings: Immigration in Contemporary Prints</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">, La Salle University Art Museum, March 16 - June 9, 2016:</SPAN><BR/><BR/>This print is based on a public art installation entitled, <SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">Eres Mi Todo</SPAN>, one of five artworks that I created for my <SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">Familias Separadas</SPAN> project. The original artwork was temporarily installed in the Courtyard Rose Compass in Philadelphia’s City Hall and highlighted in the city-wide Open Source project in October 2015.<BR/><BR/>"<SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">Eres Mi Tod</SPAN>o" are words written by Maria's husband who is currently incarcerated and in the process of deportation. After being deported from Philadelphia, he attempted to cross the border again to be reunited with his family. He was caught by U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in Texas and now has 6 months left to his three year jail sentence in California. Once his sentence is over, he will be sent back to Mexico. Maria continues to live in Philadelphia with her five children. She speaks about the difficulty of deciding whether to stay or to leave for Mexico to be reunited with her husband. <BR/><BR/>In preparation for this project, I worked with undocumented youth and families in partnership with Juntos, a Latino immigrant community-led organization fighting for human rights as immigrants, parents, youth, and workers. I collected audio stories from undocumented families that reveal how their lives changed before and after deportation. <BR/><BR/>My project reflects the stories of immigrant families that have found Philadelphia to be a safe place to provide a better future for their children. Very much like the Irish, Jewish, and Italian immigrants that made their way to the city, these families see this new home as a place of progress and safe haven, where their children will grow to be the next generation of Philadelphians (like myself, a child of immigrants) that will contribute to the livelihood and fabric of this city. Philadelphia is a sanctuary for immigrants and honoring their contributions to the growth of the city is crucial especially during the current national anti-immigrant climate. For these reasons, this project is important because it offers a platform to tell the stories of our undocumented immigrant communities that are often unheard in our city.<BR/><BR/>—Michelle Angela Ortiz<SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt"><BR/></SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by the Art Angels", "Copyright_Type" : "Artwork © Michelle Angela Ortiz", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/16-G-3751.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/16-G-3751.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/16-G-3751.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/16-G-3751.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "5784", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8114, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8114", "Disp_Access_No" : "17-G-4992", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2008", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2008", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2008", "Disp_Title" : "200 Yrs", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Allan L. Edmunds", "Sort_Artist" : "Edmunds, Allan L.", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 22 in. (76 x 56 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "22 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Offset Lithograph", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Offset Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : " Edmunds was born in Philadelphia and studied at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. He founded the Brandywine Workshop and Archives in 1972, which continues the great tradition of printmaking and artistic experimentation that has distinguished the Philadelphia arts community. Brandywine is a major source of opportunity for artists of all ages and backgrounds, especially artists of color, and is recognized internationally for its high standards of excellence and innovation. Edmunds’ lithograph, 200 Yrs, celebrates the progression of African Americans in America. The outline of a slave ship in the lower left alludes to the Slave Act of 1808, which marked early efforts to abolish the slave trade in the U.S. On the lower right a portrait of Martin Luther King Jr. represents the fight towards civil equality for African Americans. Edmunds’ print is dated 2008, the 200th anniversary of the Slave Act, and celebrates a new era in American history, with the election of Barack Obama as the first black president of the U.S. The print also features the names of African American heroes, slaves, soldiers, abolitionists, civil rights leaders, politicians, and educators, including Harriet Tubman, Booker T. Washington and Fredrick Douglass. -Tricia Sackor, Class 2017 Curatorial Intern ", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by the Art Angels", "Copyright_Type" : "Artwork © Allan L. Edmunds", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/17-G-4992.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/17-G-4992.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/17-G-4992.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/17-G-4992.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "9395", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8118, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8118", "Disp_Access_No" : "17-G-4996", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2000", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2000", "Disp_Title" : "Made in the USA", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Juan R. Fuentes", "Sort_Artist" : "Fuentes, Juan R.", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 3/4 x 17 3/4 in. (63 x 45 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "17 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Linocut", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Linocut", "Info_Page_Comm" : " As a cultural activist/artist/printmaker, Juan Fuentes has dedicated his career to being part of a global movement for social change. His works address issues relating to local communities of color, social justice, and international struggles for liberation. The turbulent times of the 70’s set the tone for Fuentes' approach to creating social art. The Chicano, African American, Middle Eastern, Asian and Native American struggles for equality, peace and justice helped shape the themes that recur in his art. - Warnock Fine Arts http://www.warnockfinearts.com/ ", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by Tom and Loretta Witt", "Copyright_Type" : "Artwork © Juan R. Fuentes", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/17-G-4996.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/17-G-4996.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/17-G-4996.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/17-G-4996.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "9400", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8120, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8120", "Disp_Access_No" : "17-G-4998", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2013", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2013", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2013", "Disp_Title" : "Posada y Yo (Posada and I)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Juan R. Fuentes", "Sort_Artist" : "Fuentes, Juan R.", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 3/8 x 13 3/8 in. (24 x 34 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "13 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Screenprint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Screenprint", "Info_Page_Comm" : " As a cultural activist/artist/printmaker, Juan Fuentes has dedicated his career to being part of a global movement for social change. His works address issues relating to local communities of color, social justice, and international struggles for liberation. Fuentes' relief printing process follows closely the social realist tradition of Latin American artists such as Jose Guadalupe Posada and Leopoldo Mendez. His personal focus has been on using the figure or portrait as a means to tell a story, elaborating on the human condition. - Warnock Fine Arts http://www.warnockfinearts.com/ ", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by the Art Angels", "Copyright_Type" : "Artwork © Juan R. Fuentes", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/17-G-4998.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/17-G-4998.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/17-G-4998.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/17-G-4998.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "9396", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 966, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/966", "Disp_Access_No" : "13-G-3580", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "c. 1950", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1945", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1955", "Disp_Title" : "Alfabetización (Literacy)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Elizabeth Catlett", "Sort_Artist" : "Catlett, Elizabeth", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 3/4 x 12 1/4 in. (24.8 x 31.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Lithograph", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : " Label from Elizabeth Catlett: Art for Social Justice, La Salle University Art Museum, March 11 - June 4, 2015: Catlett often addressed the subject of literacy and education for the poorest members of society. In Alfabetización, she depicts three Indian women seated with rebozos around their shoulders. One of the women reads from a book, as the other two listen attentively. This print was made for the national literacy campaign established in 1944 by the Mexican government. In 1953, Catlett’s image of Alfabetización also appeared on the cover of the official publication of the national literacy campaign. ", "Dedication" : "Purchased with the Benjamin D. Bernstein Acquisition Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Art © Catlett Mora Family Trust/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY ", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexico", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/13-G-3580.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/13-G-3580.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/13-G-3580.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/13-G-3580.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1261", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 942, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/942", "Disp_Access_No" : "13-G-3556", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1947", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1947", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1947", "Disp_Title" : "El Petrolio", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Elizabeth Catlett", "Sort_Artist" : "Catlett, Elizabeth", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 3/8 x 8 in. (16.2 x 20.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Linocut, Signed and Dated", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Linocut, Signed and Dated", "Info_Page_Comm" : " Label from Elizabeth Catlett: Art for Social Justice, La Salle University Art Museum, March 11 - June 4, 2015: A politically-conscious artist, Catlett produced numerous works that responded to contemporary issues. This linocut celebrated the nationalization of the petroleum industry that occurred in 1938. It is an intriguing landscape which portrays a petroleum plant with its tall towers and tanks resting in the palm of an upstretched human hand, framed by a radiating halo of bright light. The hand rises out of a giant map of Mexico, which dominates the lower half of the composition.", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by the Art Angels", "Copyright_Type" : "Art © Catlett Mora Family Trust/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY ", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexico", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/13-G-3556.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/13-G-3556.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/13-G-3556.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/13-G-3556.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1260", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2628, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2628", "Disp_Access_No" : "84-G-1305(A)", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1983", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1983", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1983", "Disp_Title" : "Survivor", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Elizabeth Catlett", "Sort_Artist" : "Catlett, Elizabeth", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 1/4 x 7 3/8 in. (23.5 x 18.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Woodcut", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : " See the interpretive label written by Candace Robertson-James, DrPH, MPH, <i>Director and Assistant Professor, Master of Public Health Program</i>, for the exhibition <i>Teaching and Learning in the Art Museum: La Salle University Faculty Selections</i> in the online exhibition <a href="https://digitalcommons.lasalle.edu/faculty_selections_2018/19/">HERE</a>. Label from <i>Elizabeth Catlett: Art for Social Justice</i>, La Salle University Art Museum, March 11 - June 4, 2015: Reminiscent of Catlett’s earlier linocuts of the 1940s and 1950s, Survivor continues the theme of dignity and endurance in the face of hardship. This striking image is closely based on a photograph by Dorothea Lange titled Ex-Slave with a Long Memory, Alabama, taken in 1937 or 1938. Lange traveled around the country for the U.S. Farm Security Administration from 1935 to1939 documenting the effects of the Great Depression. Catlett’s adaptation of Lange’s photograph for her woodcut of Survivor adds another dimension of meaning, honoring the work of the other artist and giving the image a specific subject matter rooted in African American history.", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Maurie Clifford", "Copyright_Type" : "Art © Catlett Mora Family Trust/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY ", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84-G-1305(A).jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84-G-1305(A).jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84-G-1305(A).jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84-G-1305(A).jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1272", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 968, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/968", "Disp_Access_No" : "13-G-3582", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1933", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1933", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1933", "Disp_Title" : "Dust", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Mervin Jules", "Sort_Artist" : "Jules, Mervin", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 x 13 1/2 in. (17.8 x 34.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 in.", "Disp_Width" : "13 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Lithograph", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">Label for "American Scenes: WPA-Era Prints from the 1930s and 1940s", La Salle University Art Museum, March 12- May 30, 2014:<BR/><BR/>Born in Baltimore, Jules attended the Maryland Institute College of Art from 1932-1934, and he later studied at the Art Students League in New York City under Regionalist artist Thomas Hart Benton. Jules was an accomplished painter and printmaker whose artwork focused on Social Realist themes, such as the plight of the poor. He often employed satire and caricature to dramatize social issues in a style reminiscent of 19th-century artist Honoré Daumier. <BR/><BR/>Dust portrays a desolate landscape of the American Dust Bowl in the early 1930s—a landscape devoid of human presence with eroded soil blown over unused farm machinery. This print, made while Jules was a student in Baltimore, was exhibited in the first national exhibition of the American Artists’ Congress as part of 30 duplicate “socially-conscious” exhibitions held in 30 American cities in December 1936, with the activist agenda of encouraging contact between artists and their audiences and furthering the democratization of art.<BR/><BR/>Klare Scarborough<BR/>Director and Chief Curator, La Salle University Art Museum</SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by the Art Angels", "Copyright_Type" : "Artwork © the artist or artist's estate", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/13-G-3582.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/13-G-3582.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/13-G-3582.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/13-G-3582.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2401", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 999, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/999", "Disp_Access_No" : "14-G-3599", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "c. 1935", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1930", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1940", "Disp_Title" : "Puppet Show Backstage", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Hubert Morley", "Sort_Artist" : "Morley, Hubert", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 3/4 x 7 in. (29.8 x 17.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Etching and aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">Label for "American Scenes: WPA-Era Prints from the 1930s and 1940s", La Salle University Art Museum, March 12- May 30, 2014:<BR/><BR/>Born in Wisconsin and active in Chicago and the Mid­west, Morley was a member of the Prairie Print Makers and Chicago Society of Etchers. After serving in World War I, Morley entered the Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago and worked as a commercial artist. From 1942- 1946 he was employed as a draftsman for the Corps of Engineers in the War Department. <BR/><BR/>Morley’s Puppet Show Backstage depicts a popular sub­ject associated with the Federal Theater Project, which was created in 1935 to employ theater workers. Puppet shows could be produced with small budgets and few workers but could entertain many people, especially youth, in rural communities that could not support a large theater. Additionally, puppet shows had great ap­peal during the WPA era for their instructional value for youth. Performers could use puppets not only to instruct children about arts and crafts, but also to illustrate clas­sic stories and fairy tales, and even to teach about health issues, morality, and safety. Puppet-making workshops were held all over the country for youth to learn to build their own puppets; and for some children in rural com­munities these puppets became one of the few things they owned.<BR/><BR/>Miranda Clark-Binder<BR/>Curator of Education and Public Programs, La Salle University Art Museum<BR/><BR/></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. Klare Scarborough", "Copyright_Type" : "Artwork © the artist or artist's estate", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/14-G-3599.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/14-G-3599.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/14-G-3599.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/14-G-3599.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2171", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 31, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/31", "Disp_Access_No" : "00-D-403", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "20th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1900", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1999", "Disp_Title" : "Shoe Shine Boy", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Julius Bloch", "Sort_Artist" : "Bloch, Julius", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 1/4 x 11 3/8 in. (21 x 28.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "window opening", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">Label from</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt;font-style:italic;color:#222222"> American Originals: Works on Paper from the Permanent Collectio</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt;color:#222222">n</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt;font-weight:bold;color:#222222">, </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">La Salle University Art Museum, </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt;color:#222222">December 16, 2015 through March 4, 2016:<BR/><BR/></SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">Bloch was a prominent German-born Jewish artist who immigrated to Philadelphia with his family in 1893. He studied at the Philadelphia College of Art (now University of the Arts) and PAFA, where he was influenced by Thomas Eakins. He became an important Social Realist artist known for his sympathetic depictions of working class people, particularly African American men. During the Great Depression, he worked for the Federal Art Project and received national attention for his portrayals of poor and oppressed groups of people. He became an instructor at PAFA in 1948. His work was featured in a major retrospective at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1983.<BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gift of Benjamin D. Bernstein", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "DRAWINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/00-D-403.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/00-D-403.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/00-D-403.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/00-D-403.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1591", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2781, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2781", "Disp_Access_No" : "86-D-323", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "20th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1900", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1999", "Disp_Title" : "Study of a Black Man", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Julius Bloch", "Sort_Artist" : "Bloch, Julius", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 1/8 x 6 7/8 in. (10.5 x 17.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Pen and brown ink, with gray wash", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Pen and brown ink, with gray wash", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">Label from</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt;font-style:italic;color:#222222"> American Originals: Works on Paper from the Permanent Collectio</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt;color:#222222">n</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt;font-weight:bold;color:#222222">, </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">La Salle University Art Museum, </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt;color:#222222">December 16, 2015 through March 4, 2016:<BR/><BR/></SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">Bloch was a prominent German-born Jewish artist who immigrated to Philadelphia with his family in 1893. He studied at the Philadelphia College of Art (now University of the Arts) and PAFA, where he was influenced by Thomas Eakins. He became an important Social Realist artist known for his sympathetic depictions of working class people, particularly African American men. During the Great Depression, he worked for the Federal Art Project and received national attention for his portrayals of poor and oppressed groups of people. He became an instructor at PAFA in 1948. His work was featured in a major retrospective at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1983. These two artworks illustrate variations in Bloch’s drawing techniques, from a detailed portrayal of facial features in </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt;font-style:italic">Study of a Black Man</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">, to a sketchier rendering of an outdoor scene in Shoe Shine Boy. </SPAN><BR/></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gift of Benjamin D. Bernstein", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "DRAWINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/86-D-323.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/86-D-323.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/86-D-323.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/86-D-323.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "5786", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2950, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2950", "Disp_Access_No" : "89-P-353", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "Late 19th Century-Early 20th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1867", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1932", "Disp_Title" : "Courtroom Scene (Scene d'audience, le defenseur)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jean Louis Forain", "Sort_Artist" : "Forain, Jean Louis", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 29 in. (61 x 73.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "29 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : " Forain was a master etcher, lithographer and draughtsman of social and political satire. He provided a prolific body of illustrations for daily and weekly Parisian magazines and newspapers throughout his career, especially Le Figaro. It is perhaps due to the illustrious stature of his two mentors, Daumier and Degas, as well as the popularity of his prodigious journalistic output, that his paintings have not received the attention they so often deserve. These works are divided into two periods. Up until the end of the 19th century, Forain concentrated on genre scenes in and around Paris. His concern was to capture the human figure from all walks of life engaged in a wide variety of activity, and painted with much light, bright colors and generally in a mood of joy and gaiety. The spontaneity and candid format of these paintings strongly suggest the influence of Degas. In the second half of his career, to which this painting belongs, his works became very somber in tone, sometimes almost monochromatic, and reflect the more serious side of Forain’s character. It is felt that this change of style and subject matter was a reflection of his moral conscience for the underpriviledged, and his need to express some of the poverty and suffering that he himself had experienced. 1 Around 1902, Forain’s particular concern for the injustices prevailing in the judiciary system, prompted him to begin a series of paintings of Court Room scenes as typified in this work. Laying aside his caustic wit, he became inspired by the Courts of Justice paintings of his predecessor, Daumier. And there are many echoes of Daumier’s style in Forain’s paintings as seen here: somber heavy colors, broad sketchy brushwork, horizontal format are among the more obvious correlations. Forain has successfully captured the tension of the trial as the accused awaits the outcome. The pomposity of the judge and lawyer (?) who dominate the foreground, are compared to the resignation and despair of the accused and the associates relegated to the background, their identity heavily veiled. And the viewer is led to sympathize with the tragic plight of the suspect so effectively evoked here in this image. This painting was donated by the eldest son and the daughter-in-law of the late Lessing Rosenwald, America’s foremost print collector and an avid admirer of Forain’s works, which he acquired with much enthusiasm. ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Julius Rosenwald, II.", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PAINTINGS", "Creation_Place2" : "France", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/89-P-353.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/89-P-353.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/89-P-353.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/89-P-353.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "226", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3345, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3345", "Disp_Access_No" : "96-SC-48", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1996", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1996", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1996", "Disp_Title" : "Dorothy Day", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Wells", "Sort_Artist" : "Wells, Charles", "Disp_Dimen" : "37 x 18 1/8 x 8 in. (94 x 46 x 20.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "37 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Red Oak Relief", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Red Oak Relief", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Gallery Label: As Dorothy Day’s elderly face thrusts forward, I am struck how her determined jaw, her smooth mouth and nose contrast with a deeply gouged skull, roughhewn cheeks, scarred-over eyes. Three thoughts: The mystery of the poor. They are Jesus for us; what we do for them, we do for him. Day did not see Jesus in the poor with bodily eyes, but eyes of faith. A blinded oracle, scored eyes of wood speak of deeper sight. Day saw life with the poor as unsentimental, enfolded in brokenness. Flesh mortified by cold, dirt; ears mortified by screams, noise; eyes mortified by sights of excretion, disease. Grooves and gashes mark solidarity in poverty. Francis of Assisi suffered terribly from diseased eyes. Day re-embodied Francis’s example, renewing his charism of holy poverty in herself for our modern cities and farms. Warm, strong red oak, thus fittingly commemorates a defiant, daring life of love. S. Joel Garver, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Philosophy ", "Dedication" : "Commissioned and Given by Dennis and Judy O'Brien in honor of Br. Daniel Burke's 50th anniversary as a Christian Brother", "Copyright_Type" : "Artwork © the artist or artist's estate", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "SCULPTURE", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/96-SC-48.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/96-SC-48.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/96-SC-48.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/96-SC-48.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "311", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3337, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3337", "Disp_Access_No" : "96-G-3200", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1630", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1630", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1630", "Disp_Title" : "Beggar Man and Woman Conversing", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Rembrandt van Rijn", "Sort_Artist" : "Rembrandt van Rijn", "Disp_Dimen" : "2 1/2 in. (6.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "2 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Drypoint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Drypoint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">Label for "Printmakers of the Baroque: 17th-Century Explorations of Space and Light", La Salle University Art Museum, December 16, 2013 – February 28th, 2014:<BR/><BR/>The elderly man and woman, dressed in ragged clothes, interact in a civil manner with one another. The satchel around his waist and the basket on her arm suggest that despite their poverty, they have a place in the economy of 17th-century Netherlands. <BR/><BR/>Impoverished peasants were popular subjects in the 17th century. But beggars, society’s marginalized citi­zens, were less frequently represented in art. Attitudes towards social outcasts in the Protestant Dutch society were complex. The good beggar was one who was the recipient of generous community charity. Different from the roaming vagrant, he/she was known to a commu­nity, but was expected to be invisible to it. In the early 1630s, Rembrandt van Rijn, who came to be known just as Rembrandt, illustrated them in a compassionate way. The artist may have identified with beggars because, throughout was life, he was anxious about his finances.<BR/><BR/>Irene Martinez, '14, and Kelly Sheehan, '15</SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gift of Ann Chahbandour and Jay Robert Stiefel", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/96-G-3200.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/96-G-3200.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/96-G-3200.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/96-G-3200.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "935", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2068, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2068", "Disp_Access_No" : "79-G-1065", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1974", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1974", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1974", "Disp_Title" : "Builders No. 3", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jacob Lawrence", "Sort_Artist" : "Lawrence, Jacob", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 22 1/4 in. (76.2 x 56.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "22 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Image", "Medium" : "Color Serigraph", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Color Serigraph", "Info_Page_Comm" : " Lawrence was one of the most successful and influential African American artists of the 20th century. Born in Atlantic City, NJ, he grew up in the Philadelphia area then moved to New York City as a teenager. He dropped out of high school at age 16 but took classes at the Harlem Art Workshop with Charles Alston. In 1941, when he was 23 years old, he completed his best known works, the Migration Series, a sequence of 60 paintings about the Great Migration of American Americans from rural South to the urban North, which were purchased by the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. Many of Lawrence’s artworks illustrate stories from African American history, as well as scenes from contemporary black culture. In the late 1940s, he began to explore the theme of Builders, which became the focus of another well-known series. He wrote, "The Builders came from my own observations of the human condition. If you look at a work closely, you see that it incorporates things other than the builders, like a street scene, or a family." With Builders No. 3, Lawrence depicts three male carpenters handling various construction tools. He employs a dynamic Modernist style, with flat planes of bold colors, formal rhythms, and an up-tilted picture plane. Beyond the workmen, the presence of pedestrians indicates the urban setting and suggests the vibrancy of city life. ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Edward I. Bernstein", "Copyright_Type" : "© 2016 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "PRINTS", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/79-G-1065.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/79-G-1065.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/79-G-1065.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/79-G-1065.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2644", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 316, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/316", "Disp_Access_No" : "07-G-3414", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1937", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1937", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1937", "Disp_Title" : "The People Work- Morning", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Benton Murdoch Spruance", "Sort_Artist" : "Spruance, Benton Murdoch", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 x 15 7/8 in. (58.4 x 40.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 in.", "Disp_Width" : "15 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Lithograph", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-size:10pt">Label for "American Scenes: WPA-Era Prints from the 1930s and 1940s", La Salle University Art Museum, March 12- May 30, 2014:<BR/><BR/>Benton Spruance was a Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts-trained Philadelphia artist. Lithography was not taught at the Academy during Spruance’s student days in the 1920s. 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